HEED Nepal Organization

Information of Nepal, HEED and its working Districts

Nepal

Nepal (officially the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal) is located in South Asia, sandwiched between China and India. It is the home to Mt. Everest, the birthplace of Lord Buddha and is one of few countries in the world never to have been colonized. The country is laden with the Himalayan mountains and hills in the north and flat plains in the south. The largest and the capital city is Kathmandu, which is situated in the central region of the country. Tourism and agriculture are the major sources of revenue and livelihood for a vast majority of the Nepalese people, most of who are based in rural areas.

Despite its stunning beauty and a proud history, Nepal has long suffered from major political upheavals, clearly reflected from its poor socio-economic performance (HDI ranking 144th in 2009). In addition to a decade-long civil war, centralized government and polarization of wealth and power have severely hindered the growth of the country. These in turn have resulted in abysmal living conditions a recent study indicated that 64% of the population survives below $1.5 a day, and according to the Human Development Report (2009), 78% of the population lives on under $2 a day. The war has also taken a heavy toll on the national education infrastructure as schools were bombed and innocent children abducted for political indoctrination in the rebel army. The low adult literacy rate has incited widespread prejudices and injustice, such as gender and caste discrimination, further causing people to live a marginalized life. For instance HDR 2009 reported that merely 9% of the poorest women have completed fifth-grade education.

Nepal has finally seen a hope for peace today as the country is going through a string of sensitive political developments, including the release of 3,000 child soldiers from militia camps in 2009. The process of drafting a new constitution is currently underway, as the democratic parties (most notably the Nepal Congress Party, Nepal Communist Party - Unified Marxist-Leninist, and the Nepal Community Party - Maoist) sort their differences out.

Dhading
Dhading information

HEED Nepal is trying to provide more detail information of Dhading District, The Himalaya range of Ganesh himal, Manaslu and other neighboring mountains of Rasuwa, Langtang lirung, sangen himal, Annapurna, Lamjung himal and glacier lakes of the mountains. The popular lakes, Kalo raha, Seto raha, Ganesh kunda, Diplu kunda and its high passes to low land of Dhading district. The mountain range Ganesh is the predominate mountain range located within Dhading. All of the peaks are over 7,000 meters with some approaching 8,000. The 8,000+ meter mountain Manaslu Annapurna and Langtang Lirung is clearly visible from much of Dhading, although it is located within the bounds of Gorkha and Rasuwa.

Dhading District is a part of Bagmati zone, is one of the seventy-five districts of Nepal. Dhading Besi is district headquarters, covers an area of 1,926 km and has a population (2001) of 338,658. The district extends from 27 40\ N to 28 14\ N Latitude and 84 E to 85 1\ East longitude and is surrounded by Gorkha district in the west, Kathmandu and Nuwakot the east, Makawanpur and Chitwan in the south and Rasuwa district in the north. Dhading District lies its altitude ranges from 300 m. at Jogimara near Trisuli river to 7110m in central Nepal. Dhading district headquarters 640m above sea level.

It is one of the remote districts in the central Nepal with the population of 3,80,369. The district has only 43% adult literacy rate (53.69% male and 33.81% female). Dhading is 80% farmland and 20% forest. Unfortunately most of the protected forest is located near or next to the road which doesnt make for great trekking but of course on the Tiru danda and most of northern valley in Ganesh himal region. The transnational\King Prithivi Highway\ connecting Kathmandu and Pokhara/ Nayanghat runs through the southern portion of the district making for easy access to the Kathmandu valley.

The road parallels the \Trishuli\ River. Dhading is 80% farmland and 20% forest between Budi Gandaki in the south west in the range of Annapuna and Manaslu Himalaya ranage and Trishuli and bhotekoshi in the North East with the rang of Langtang Himalaya eastern mountain ranage with boarder with Tibet.

It is divided into 50 Village Development Committees and 3 electoral constituencies. The district represents perfectly Nepals multi-ethnic, multi-lingual and multi-religious environment with Tamang ethnic group (21.5%), Hindu religion (74%) and Nepali language(72.2%). Dhading comes in 55th position among 75 districts of Nepal in Human Development Index with literacy rate of 42.72% (female literacy being 33%), life expectancy of 58.6 years, Infant Mortality Rate of 101.7 per 1000 live births, and Child Mortality Rate of 91.9 per 1000 live births.

The district has a high percentage of poor and marginalized ethnic communities including Tamang, Magar, Gurung, Kumal, Dalits and Chepang. These ethnic groups have a poor socio-economic condition when compared to other castes such as Brahmins and Chhetris. Skin diseases, diaorrhea, gastritis, bintestinal worms, typhoid and ear infection are among the common diseases suffered by the people. The health care system in the district is minimal. The population doctor ratio is 76000 per doctor. Only 35.78% of married couple has access to family planning services and health workers attend only 27% of births.


Dhading district is considered is to be the shadow under light. It is left behind in different dimensions of development including health despite being a border district to the capital city.
Educations and the government schools in the villages are almost exist. However, with time, it is gradually progressing with waves of development extending from headquarters Dhading Bensi to other villages but not yet the villages like in Upper Ankhu valleys.

Healthcare education and institutional information in Dhading district
There is one district hospital, 2 PHCs, 16 health posts, 33 sub health posts, some Ayurved centers under the government health system and there are at least 5 private hospitals and numerous organizations working in different aspects of health in different parts of the district. The district has produced about 35 doctors, 90 nurses and a large number of other health professions and different levels and many more are studying to graduate in various cities of Nepal and abroad. But due to centralization of health services, only a few of them are working in Dhading and the deficit of health workers is distinctly fallen in district.

In this context, if that health care provides including students born and grown up in the soil of Dhading or attached to it share the feeling of responsibility towards their homeland and spare a part of their time, ideas and resources towards this end our people bit of relief. The small effort of individuals when collected becomes a great achievement. If that collective effort is organized, it becomes systematic, transparent and officials.

Thus, an organization named HEED Nepal Organization officially came into existence, registered in DAO in 2002 as nongovernment, non political, nonprofit making social organization. Since then, it has become a common platform of like minded health care, education, livelihoods and provides working for the health of people, school and Education, and Assist for poor with environment friendly, especially in Dhading with encourager support from people of all walks of life. Its activities and programs have organized scattered human resources in Health, Education, Environment, Economic and development initiatives to share new and creative ideas and contribute substantially in our mission.

Upper Ankhu Valley: Sertung, Tipling, Lapa, Jharlang and Rigaon VDCs in Ganesh Himal Region
Upper Ankhu khola valley:

The paper discusses the peoples that live in the upper Ankhu Khola valley, which is located about 45 km west of Kathmandu. Mainly Tamang (over 70%), smaller groups of Gurungs and Newars live in this area.Ganesh himal and Pabil himal is the highest point of the region. The neighboring highest peak in this region is Manaslu, which at 8163m is the 8th highest peak in the world and Langtang Himal.Lamjung and Annapurna.Ganesh Himal is named after the Hindu God of Good Fortune. The Tiru Danda offers breath taking views of it. The mountain Ganesh himal has climbed by Tilman in yearly 1955. The area is highly diverse, being home to Brahmin, Chhetri, Tamang is the most, Magar, Tibetan and Gurung peoples

Manaslu was first climbed on May 9, 1956 by Toshio Imanishi from Japan and Gyalzen Norbu of Nepal
The region shelters endangered animals such as the snow leopard and red pandas especially in the northern reaches as Buddhist Lamas prohibit the killing of animals.

A hidden gem here is the Ganesh himal basecamp/ upper Ankhu valley Loop and Tsum Valley Really worth .

Local culture, customs, its hospitality, respecters, Languages, red panda, beers, Monkey, snow leopard, natural hot spring, Temple, Gumpas, Chorten, wild honey, typical birds, medicinal plants, mines, Crystals, Lamas, Shamans, rivers, flora, fauna, species, rhododendron , pine trees, waterfalls, typical pujas are its main attraction points in the Ganesh himal region or in Upper Ankhu khola valley.

More information of the Ganesh Himal region:
Nepal is a country of villages. Many villages are in remote areas of the country. Lapa, Sertung, Jharlng, Ri gaun and Tipling VDCs and some other villages are located in the most remote area of Dhading District lies in upper Ankhu valley; in the northwest of Kathmandu, shaped with Ganesh Himal between two mountain that are the Mt. Langtag Lirung in the northeast and Mt. Manaslu in the south west by the two river called Trishuli in the east and budigandaki in the south in the Upper Ankhu valley. It takes three days to walk from the nearest road and nearest city or market (Dhading Bensi) which is the local administrative centre of legal and development centre.

Geographically, village allows for some stunning views of the mountains, lakes and various type of flora and fauna. The vegetation and Medicinal plants are more than 200 types a well as thousands types species in upper Ankhu valley and the surrounding regions. Terraced farming using traditional methods, i.e. beasts of burden, is very common. Children are often seen herding cattle and goats in the day time and evenings. Not only the people of upper Ankhu, but all surrounding villages of lower Ankhu valley and people likes Chalish, Tipling, lapa and jharlang has same life style and literacy rate is very low due to ill equipped school, Low quality and the poor economic condition of the people. Communication facilities is almost nil, as well as healthcare facilities because of its remoteness and harsh geographic conditions and not been reached the development initiatives. It is matter that lives of people are bellowing national level in average.

The region, A lack of developmental infrastructures, besides roads, is pervasive. The use of technology is minimal and communication devices are often times rendered futile because of unreliable services. There is no centrally located medical services and personnel in Chalish village, and even not in the central Area of Upper Ankhu valley which has even not compromised the health of children and the women. The use of basic healthcare are far way behind for local people. The food consumed in the village comes right off the farms, making each meal fresh and organic. But, The stable food for the people in the region are only limit for 4 months. In relation to climate, tropical to alpine types of vegetation are available in the region.

The Upper Ankhu Valley is the area of Aromatic Medicinal plants in the Ganesh himal region. A number of medicinal plant species are used in different traditional systems in diversified patterns from centuries ago in the region. Still today vast majorities of the rural people use medicinal plants and are dependent on traditional healers for their primary health care. The age old practice of using these plant resources in traditional medicine is still in existence in the rural areas of the country. These medicinal plants are the natural resources of income generation for a vast majority of rural people and have been looked upon as a resource for the poverty reduction thereby using these resources to meet one of the national targets of the country. Rare and high priced medicinal plants are on the top priority with their domestication, cultivation, processing and marketing.

Needless to say, the literacy rates are abysmal too, owing to a lack of proper schools. The few who are educated settle either in the cities or abroad, thus aggravating this socio-economic disparity. With withered physical structures and under-staffed faculty, the existing state-run schools are in a very poor condition. The quality of education they provide to the children do not compare to those of the city and other private schools. The immediate need that we see is the renovating the schools and provide all other resources possible to build a decent studying environment. Further, the factors that lead to high dropout rates among the student must be identified and dealt with accordingly.

Chalish village information:
The people of the Chalish and its surrounding villages in the upper and lower Ankhu valley depends on agriculture but the harsh climate and working in the fields for long tedious hours is a hazardous job, as the fields are often swept away by the monsoon rains which often produce minimum output. It is a subsistence based economy but they grow barely enough to feed everyone in the village even for six months.

The stable food is maize, millet, wheat, barley and potatoes. There are no new farming technology and follows their old generation for their survive. There is very little income to encourage their children to be educated and pay for their health facilities. Some people earn little money by pottering for trekking parties from they use this little money for buying salt some rice and some clothes for their daily needs. There is no way of sending their children in school and paying, for books, stationeries and healthcare. The facilities getting education and healthcare facilities are almost Nil.

As of a few years ago, there were no schools and teacher in Chalish village due to the repeated request by the villagers, the government currently funds up to Class three in primary school. After the class three, there is no opportunities even to finished their Primary level ( class 5 ). In the Education who take interest he must leave his family and should go Next village or community walking 3 or 4 days even though, they couldnt get good school for the poor students which is not only in entire chalish village even for whole Upper Ankhu valley people.

This is because; Due to low per capital expenditure per students and administration of the school is centralized in Kathmandu. Chalish school is often neglected by the Government and under resourced. For students who are capable of creating their bright futures, the lack of education and resources confines them to a life of poverty and misery.

HEED Nepal has been meticulously worked to ameliorate this condition and in the past years has achieved some success in filling the void in the educational sector, Healthcare education, saving planet through recycling the tubes and plastics which is non biodegradable, introducing wild Medicinal Aromatic plants for domestication and preserving Varied types of medicinal plants in the availability in these different climatic belts. The eco-tourism through introducing local traditional and customs, natural resources and current development initiatives are the attraction of various program for mountain people and rural poor by HEED Nepal Organization.

Gorkha

Gorkha Information


Situated on the North-central part of Nepal, the Gorkha district hosts a very significant historical and political identity. is situation on the North-central part of Nepal. The district capital, Gorkha Bazaar, is about 140kms west of Kathmandu at an altitude of 1,135m. Gorkhas centerpiece is the magnificent Gorkha Durbar with a fort, a palace and a temple with excellent views of the surrounding valleys, and the Mansalu range.

The history of modern Nepal started some 200 years ago from the Gorkha district, whence King Prithivi Narayan Shah conquered 22 small kingdoms and created the Nepal as we know today. His legacy passed on to his successors who kept foreign occupation at bay. The formidable courage and bravery earned the Gorkha soldiers great respect among the East India Company (British regime in India), who knew the Nepalese soldiers as the Gurkhas. After a standstill in a battle in Nalapani (eastern Nepal), a treaty was signed between Nepal and the Great Britain that allowed the Gorkha soldiers to enroll in a special regiment called the Gurkha Rifles in the British Army. The Gurkhas have fought bravely in many international battles, most notably in the two World Wars, the Falkland War and the Gulf Wars.

Gorkha is also an alternate starting point for a few trekking routes in the region. Gorkha-Trisuli is an easy three day walk along unspoiled Nepali country side. One can also walk a long days walk to Besishahar, which is the usual starting point for Annapurna and Manang area treks. One can also walk through Besishahar area to Pokhara in a four days.

Sadly, the Gorkha district and other remote areas have been neglected by the government even during peacetime. Most people in this region survive on subsistence farming and are subjected to abject poverty. Gorkha trails behind in socio-economic development and the existing infrastructure requires extensive renovation. As a result, the quality of life in the region has been severely impacted.

Arupokhari: Sarswoti peace school, Kashi Gaon, Yarsa and Dhunchet VDC in Gorkha.
Perched on a chain of hills, Arupokari is a cluster of 9 villages (Village Development Committes) and lies about 6 hours from the Gorkha Bazaar. The nearest market from Arupokhari is Arughat, along the banks of the Budi Gandaki river. It takes about 45 minutes of uphill walking from the market to the nearest Arupokhari village. The make-shift dirt road is mostly unusable most of the year due to landslides and erosion. The village started receiving electricity only in early 2011, which has brought new prospect of growth and progress in the region.

The topology of the village allows for some stunning views of the mountains and the surrounding regions. Terraced farming using traditional methods, i.e. beasts of burden, is very common. Children are often seen herding cattle and goats in the day time and evenings. The food consumed in the village comes right off the farms, making each meal fresh and organic.

It is a matter of great concern that the quality of living in the region is well below the national average. A lack of developmental infrastructures, besides roads, is pervasive. The use of technology is minimal and communication devices are often times rendered futile because of unreliable services. There is no centrally located medical services and personnel in Arupokhari, kasi Gaon, Yarsa and Dhunchet VDCs. village which has compromised the health of especially the children and the women.

Needless to say, the literacy rates are abysmal too, owing to a lack of proper schools. The few who are educated settle either in the cities or abroad, thus aggravating this socio-economic disparity. With withered physical structures and under-staffed faculty, the existing state-run schools are in a very poor condition. The quality of education they provide to the children do not compare to those of the city and other private schools. The immediate need that we see is the renovating the schools and provide all other resources possible to build a decent studying environment. Further, the factors that lead to high dropout rates among the student must be identified and dealt with accordingly.

HEED Nepal has been meticulously worked to ameliorate this condition and in the past years has achieved some success in filling the void in the educational sector, Healthcare education, saving planet through recycling the tubes and plastics which is non biodegradable, introducing wild Medicinal Aromatic plants for domestication and preserving Varied types of medicinal plants in the availability in these different climatic belts. The eco-tourism through introducing local traditional and customs, natural resources and current development initiatives are the attraction of various program for mountain people and rural poor by HEED Nepal Organization.